Search This Blog

Sunday, February 26, 2012

26th February

For me the day was not much different to yesterday, so a chance to practice using the camera.

However a pair of Blackcaps were seen in the Cricket Pen, area 31.

DSC_7018

Common Pochard, though common in Regent’s Park not that widespread in the UK and it looks great in the right light and posture. Red crested Pochard below.

DSC_6991

DSC_7043

Grey lag Goose dropping in, noisy b----- thing, likewise the bird below.

DSC_7047

DSC_7277

Cormorants have been using the Heron Island (area 8) as a roost site for the past 15 years. The trees are becoming heavily white washed and likely to die in the not to distant future as happens at typical roost and nest sites.

DSC_7029

Magpie is the second most numerous member of the corvid family in the park while the high flying Rook below is the rarest of the commoner UK members. Bright crisp days in February are the types of day when this species can occur.

DSC_7004

DSC_7336

Stock Dove

DSC_7379

DSC_0256

The LBB Gull with a growth on it’s head (above) was photographed last March and is back again still in the same plumage.

DSC_7042

DSC_7090

And then the sun came out

DSC_7262

DSC_7267

DSC_7185

DSC_7116DSC_7063

DSC_7365

DSC_7110DSC_7307

In coming and out going Herons

DSC_7357

4 comments:

Pete Woodruff said...

Made good use of the camera today Tony with some very nice shots to see here, the drake Pochard at the top is particularly attractive.

Tony Duckett said...

Thanks Pete, there aren't many species of duck where the drakes don't look fine in breeding plumage.

birdman_euston said...

27 Feb: Drake redhead Smew seen roosting again on the north shore of Heron Island. Wintering flock of 10 starlings still present in Area 40.

28 Feb: No sign of yesterday's Smew. At 08.30 a flock of 25 Goldfinches (the largest group I've seen in the Park) was feeding on last year's (goldenrod?) seed heads in the small, fenced-off part of Area 40 (the part that has a stainless-steel gate lashed to the black iron fence). Pair of Little Grebes regularly feeding near the reed beds at Long Bridge. They are noisy and energetic so despite their small size, they don't seem to get bullied as much as the far larger but more docile Moorhens by the ubiquitous Coots.

birdman_euston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.