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Thursday, November 06, 2014

6th November

Regent’s Park

I noticed a small movement of birds over my garden this morning. These included 2 Lapwings that flew NW at 8.42am before returning at 8.48am but heading towards the east.

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One of the 6 Fieldfares that flew west and one of 10 Blackbirds that also flew in the same direction but singularly.

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I thought taking a short stroll by the lake may make me feel better, staying indoors was making my headache worse.

There were a handful of Meadow Pipits heading west, however I was surprised to see 2 Stonechats heading north west.

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Post Wars

Unless you are one of the larger species of gull and an adult, it is hard to hold on your post.

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5 comments:

Joe Beale said...

2 Stonechats heading NW? That's quite an interesting sighting, can't say I've ever noticed that species actively on the move before.

Tony Duckett said...

Hi Joe.

Chats nearly always turn up in the park during daylight hours, only once have I encountered a bird that I think turned up possibly overnight.

Joe Beale said...

I've noticed that with Wheatears and even seen them on the move a few times but never seen Stonechats actually arriving or departing, only when they've already arrived (when it's not always clear if they've been there all morning and been missed or just dropped in). But it must be a similar thing to Wheatear migration tendencies I suppose!

Tony Duckett said...

I agree but the larger members of the thrush family are certainly more nocturnal, leaving mainland Europe and hoping to drop down as soon as possible once the sun is up. However misty mornings mean they can loose their bearings and continue in land for a couple of hours after dawn before eventually dropping down to feed. I have witnessed some sad sights of birds dropping into the sea with less than 100 metres to go to reach land.

Joe Beale said...

Yes that seems so. After a couple of hours beyond dawn, most of the time anyway, Redwing/Fieldfare/Blackbird etc migration peters out. I don't get to the coast so much but a few times I have seen thrushes arriving only just above the waves - one Song thrush was so close but it got pushed down and eaten by a GBB Gull. What's interesting to me is that chats just don't seem so visible to me. For example, Redwings are noticeable when they move in daylight, but do the Wheatears, Stonechats, Whinchats etc fly higher or is it just because they don't form big flocks and make lots of noise compared to large thrushes? Or even just because they're smaller? Whatever the case - from an inland perspective - I only occasionally see Wheatears on active migration, for example, and not yet Stonechats.