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Tuesday, April 14, 2015

14th April

Regent’s Park

With really clear blue skies virtually all day, witnessing any visual migration was going to be difficult. There seemed to be a drop in numbers of our commoner migrants.

Sparrowhawk: a female and male were in the air at different times but they probably had different partners.

Kestrel: another quirk with the birds in the Wetland Pen was the arrival of another female. It could have been one of last years young but there were 2 female present this morning, one in a box and the other in a nearby tree.

Meadow Pipit: 4 flew north at mid-day.

Sedge Warbler: this species is a tricky one to connect with in the park and is the scarcest of the UK’s commonest warblers that visit the park, with the exception of the Wood Warbler, which used to be as common if not commoner. Todays bird was singing quietly in area 41.

Blackcap: over 8 males singing today.

Willow Warbler: 3 birds were singing a big drop on the previous few days high numbers.

Chiffchaff: 7 males around the park. 

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Can you spot the Sedge Warbler, he was a sneaky little critter as he crept about in brambles? It wasn’t an easy.

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The grebes looked good on the water.

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A pair of adult LBB Gulls gang up on another bird.

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The nest that had 4 young seems to have lost one, it must have failed to get back after it’s first flight. I only looked from a distance the other day and thought the 4 birds at the nest were all youngsters, the adults normally drop the food and get out of there as quick as they can.

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The nest in the Cherry tree has at least 2 chicks, one is visible here.

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Not really the fairest of fights?

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