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Friday, January 01, 2016

Regent's Park recent photos

Regent's Park



There has been little change in the species present in the park. The more unusual one's can sometimes be hard to see or pin down. We haven't had many sunny days, so when the sun was out I took the opportunity to take a few interesting snaps.

I carried out my first New Years Day bird count in the park this morning. I was working but managed to spend sometime in the key areas of the park. I was surprised by the final total 68, which could possibly have been 69 if I had got slightly better views of 2 Redpolls in the Chat Enclosure (area 39). They were perched in a Willow on the far side of the area and looked large and pale enough to be Common Redpolls. They unfortunately flew off north when a Magpie landed close to them. The days count can be seen below





                                                       Little Owl


                                          Siskin


                                          3rd winter Yellow-legged Gull

                                          Gadwall


                                          Red crested Pochard


                                          Grey Heron in one of the new Heron Baskets  









                                          Common Gull & B H Gull





8 comments:

Arjun Dutta said...

Dear Tony,
My name is Arjun and I live in Sutton in South London.
I am 12 and I read your blog daily as birdwatching is my biggest hobby.
My family and I rarely go to Regents Park as my younger sister likes to go to Hyde Park more but we are planning on coming sometime soon.
After seeing your fantastic blog today, I couldn't help asking where the tree that the Little Owl's live is.
No matter how hard I try I can never see Barn or Little owls (despite waking up at 5 o'clock on a school trip in the Breccon Beacons after hearing about nearby nesting birds!)
Thank You!

Tony Duckett said...

Hi Arjun.

I am always glad to here from the next generation of bird watchers and am very pleased that you follow my blog. The Little Owls are not always on show especially if there is a strong wind blowing. If you open the link to the map of the park which at the moment is to the right of the image of the Yellow-legged Gull that is on the water. If you look for area 31 and the words Cricket Pen, the tree the owls are favour at this time of the year is where the "E" in Pen is. The holes they use are almost halfway up on the eastern side of the tree. East is to the right of the park. Good luck

Arjun Dutta said...

Thank you Tony!
Will try to see them at point.
Arjun

Arjun Dutta said...

I always feel very weird when I appear at Barnes Wetland Centre or other nature reserves with binoculars, a big camera and a telescope!
I hope there are others like me!

Arjun Dutta said...

I always feel very weird when I appear at Barnes Wetland Centre or other nature reserves with binoculars, a big camera and a telescope!
I hope there are others like me!

Tony Duckett said...

To get the most out of birding those pieces of equipment are essential. If not you might end up not getting great views rather than distant views of an unusual visitor. A telescope is needed at Barnes, though I wouldn't use one in Regent's unless I was watching the breeding Kestrels or something that viewing from a distance was important so not to disturb it. A camera will enable you to capture a special moment, I have regretted not taking my camera several times.

Vince Murphy said...

Hello Tony,

Thanks for all your efforts to share the great sightings and insights with us. I noticed on your New Year's Day count you encountered two Woodcocks. That seems remarkable to me. Where and under what circumstances did you observe them? I would very much like to see a Woodcock.

Regards,

Vince Murphy

Vince Murphy said...

Hi Tony,

By the way, I was walking along the Boating Lake on December 6, and I came across two Whooper Swans that were calmly waiting for people to throw them bread. They were right at the edge, surrounded by Canada Geese and Coots. Are these captive birds? I was surprised to see them there.

Thanks,

Vince Murphy